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You Are Welcome Here.

The goal of The Faith-ing Project is to enrich your spiritual life.   Our hope is that this  might be a gymnasium for the soul; a library for the spirit; and a toy store for the psyche.

On December 18, we will begin our next email campaign!  Use the contact button on this page, or email otherjeffcampbell7@gmail.com to receive a free, daily invitation to participate in a spiritual exercise focused on the advent or solstice.   This campaign will last 2 weeks.  In addition to the daily contemplation, expect opportunities for processing and connecting, audio files, and more!  For more information, click here.

At the bottom of this page you can find an individualized listing of the spiritual exercises described on this website.  If you would like to see the various subgroups that these exercises can be broken down into, you can click here.   Also, take a look at the menu to the right.

To sample audio files and preview other content exclusive to patrons, click here.

For some information on how to integrate your spiritual practice into your life, click here.

To explore some resources that have been influential in the formation of The Faith-ing Project, click here.

To explore some practices which are less neglected by contemporary American Christianity, click here.

To see a sample of some of the email campaigns we have engaged in, click here.

If you would rather go straight to the exercises without background and context, click the links below:

Exercise 1: God’s Name

Exercise 2: Breathing With God

Exercise 3: A split-Breath Prayer

Exercise 4: A Time for Silence, A Time for Speaking

Exercise 5: Lectio Divina

Exercise 6: 3-phrase Cycles

Exercise 7: More Lectio

Exercise 8: Sacred Writing with an Unconscious Focus

Exercise 9: Sacred Writing With a Deliberative Focus

Exercise 10: Centered Prayer

Exercise 11: The Word We Need the Most

Exercise 12: Constant Repetition

Exercise 13: Apaphatic Meditation

Exercise 14: Candles, Clouds & Waves

Exercise 15: The Riverside Meditations

Exercise 16: Apaphatic Meditation with Variable Phrasing

Exercise 17: Emphasizing a different word within a phrase

Exercise 18: Who am I, God?  Who are you, God?

Exercise 19: A Second Riverside Meditation

Exercise 20: Tonglen

Exercise 21: Listening to God Listen to You

Exercise 22: Slowly Honing in Via Lectio

Exercise 23: The 5 Remembrances

Exercise 24: A Walk with Jesus

Exercise 25: Padres

Exercise 26: Nature Adoration

Exercise 27: The Examen

Exercise 28: The Jesus Prayer

Exercise 29: A Prayer for…

Exercise 30: The Five Senses

Exercise 31: Adoration

Exercise 32: 7-11 Breathing

Exercise 33: Through a Verse, One Word at a Time

Exercise 34: The Examen with Multiple Questions

Exercise 35: Loving-Kindness and Grattitude

Exercise 36: A Welcoming Prayer

Exercise 37: Apaphatic Prayer focused on Trinity

Exercise 38: The Countdown

____________________________________________________________________________________________

You can help in turning The Faith-ing Project into a fully functioning community.  You can do this in several ways:

  • Share your thoughts, feelings, and criticism below in the comments.
  • email otherjeffcampbell7@gmail.com to share something directly with the Project’s Director, to join our next email campaign, or to ask to be placed on the mailing list.
  • Access exclusive content and help The Faithing Project share spiritual practices with a world in desperate need.  Become a  Patron.
  • follow @faithingproject on twitter.

 

 

Solstice & Advent: Day 2

This is a space to  share any reactions, thoughts, or comments from the 2nd day of the email campaign.  If you would like to join us for the remaining 12 days of this campaign (free of charge) fill out the contact form above, or email otherjeffcampbell7@gmail.com  A few questions that come to my mind right now:

#1) What was today’s practice like for you?  What were some similarities and some differences between Day 1 and Day 2 for you?

#2) Do you feel like you have much of an answer to the questions you have been asking?  Can you put this answer into words?

#3) Is there a benefit to asking questions that don’t have easy answers?

#4)  What kinds of things are you struggling with on these practices?  What is going well?  Is anything surprising you?

___________________________________________________________________________________

You can help in turning The Faith-ing Project into a fully functioning community.  You can do this in several ways:

  • Share your thoughts, feelings, and criticism below in the comments.
  • email otherjeffcampbell7@gmail.com to share something directly with the Project’s Director, to join our next email campaign, or to ask to be placed on the mailing list.
  • Access exclusive content and help The Faithing Project share spiritual practices with a world in desperate need.  Become a  Patron.
  • follow @faithingproject on twitter.

Solstice & Advent: As We Begin

For more information on The Faith-ing Project’s  December campaign, click here.

In the comments below, I hope you will share some thoughts and reactions to the following questions– especially if you will be participating in the campaign.

  1. How did you feel about the day 1 activities?
  2.  What general things would you like to share about yourself?
  3. Have solstice or advent had any significance in your past?
  4. Do solstice or advent have any significance in your present?
  5. What is your experience and opinion around spiritual exercises?
  6. What are your hopes and fears for this campaign?
  7. What sorts of traditions, prayers, meditations, and contemplative activities do you find helpful and powerful?  (Especially as related to solstice or advent?)

Exercise 38: The Countdown

This simple mindfulness exercise is a powerful way to reign in anxiety.  It might be used as a precursor to another spiritual exercise, or as a way of handling racing thoughts.

Exercise:

  1.  Breathe deeply.  Place your feet flat on the ground.
  2. Identify and name to yourself 5 things you can see.
  3. Take a cleansing breath.
  4. Identify and name 4 things you can hear.
  5. Take a cleansing breath.
  6. Identify and name 3 things you can feel.  (textures, pressures etc; not emotions.)
  7. Take a cleansing breath.
  8.  Identify and name 2 things you can smell.
  9. Take a cleansing breath.
  10. Identify and name 1 thing you taste.

As you go about your day, recall that your senses have no worries about the future and no concerns with the past.  Do this exercise, in whole or in part, whenever you are needing to be rooted in the now.

You can help in turning The Faith-ing Project into a fully functioning community.  You can do this in several ways:

  • Share your thoughts, feelings, and criticism below in the comments.
  • email otherjeffcampbell7@gmail.com to share something directly with the Project’s Director, to join our next email campaign, or to ask to be placed on the mailing list.
  • Access exclusive content and help The Faithing Project share spiritual practices with a world in desperate need.  Become a  Patron.
  • follow @faithingproject on twitter.

 

 

  1. afe, quiet environment for yourself.  Turn down your phone and consider lighting a candle.
  2. Breathe deeply in through the nose and out through the mouth.
  3. Take a mental inventory of where you are, right now.  List the feelings you are experiencing.  Do your best to engage this with a nonjudgemental attitude.  Your feelings are neither good nor bad.  They simply are.  
  4. Choose the feeling which seems to be the most impactful.  Think, or say “Welcome ___________”  (E.G. ‘Welcome, Fear.  Welcome, sadness.  Welcome, anxiety.  Etc.)
  5. Say, or think, ‘I let go of my desire to change this feeling.’  or ‘I let go of my ___________’  or ‘God, I give you my _____________’
  6. Progress on to the next emotion, repeating steps 4 and 5.
  7. When you have worked through these emotions, spend a moment doing a mental inventory, assessing whether you feel differently.

36 B

  1. Create a safe, quiet environment for yourself.  Turn down your phone and consider lighting a candle.
  2. Breathe deeply in through the nose and out through the mouth.
  3. Take a mental inventory of where you are, right now.  List the feelings you are experiencing.  Do your best to engage this with a nonjudgemental attitude.  Your feelings are neither good nor bad.  They simply are.  
  4. Choose the feeling which seems to be the most impactful.  Think, or say “Welcome ___________”  (E.G. ‘Welcome, Fear.  Welcome, sadness.  Welcome, anxiety.  Etc.)
  5. Breathe once.
  6. Say, or think “I let go of my desire for security and survival.’
  7. Breathe again.
  8. Say, or think, ‘I let go of my desire for esteem and affection.’
  9. Breathe again.
  10. Say, or think ‘I let go of my desire for power and control.’
  11. Breathe.
  12. Say, or think, ‘I let go of my desire to change the situation.’
  13. If you wish, you can repeat this process for a second, troubling emotion.

 

Contemplation and Pseudo-Contemplation

There are so many things competing for our attention.

The makers of our devices are engaged in a kind-of arms race.  Instead of creating weapons of destruction, instead of having a goal of militaristic conquest, they are creating weapons of distraction.  The goal is not conquest, it is mindlessness.  But it is still an arms race.

They are very good at what they do.  And the goods and services they provide are not bad things in moderation.

But make no mistake: endlessly scrolling through a facebook feed only feels like meditation.

(And please, feel no judgement or shame here!  I am writing as much to myself as I am to you, dear reader!  These struggles are real!)

Further, meditating but being willing to be distracted…  Engaging in a spiritual exercise while having my facebook page open, so that I can take a little break if I get that endorphin-producing ‘ping’….  that is not really meditation.  That is wasting time while I am hoping that something interesting is going to happen on my social media feeds.

Part of the growth promised by these spiritual exercises is in facing down boredom.  More than just filling my time, the important thing is that I stop running from my fears about myself and the world.  This is why it is so valuable to commit to a length of time each day.  So much good will result when I don’t offer myself easy retreats out of this sometimes difficult work.

Let’s make a deal with each other, and with outselves.  Let’s agree that we might choose to engage in distractions: music to fill up the air, games as candy for our eyes, social media as a venue for our monkey mind to do a little dance.  But let’s be honest about it.  If we are going to do it, let’s make the conscious decision to do these things.  They are o.k. in moderation.  But let’s not pretend that we are meditating while really we are just looking for an excuse to engage those activities.

You can help in turning The Faith-ing Project into a fully functioning community.  You can do this in several ways:

  • Share your thoughts, feelings, and criticism below in the comments.
  • email otherjeffcampbell7@gmail.com to share something directly with the Project’s Director, to join our next email campaign, or to ask to be placed on the mailing list.
  • Access exclusive content and help The Faithing Project share spiritual practices with a world in desperate need.  Become a  Patron.
  • follow @faithingproject on twitter.

 

Exercise 37: An Apaphatic Prayer Around the Trinity

Background: Apaphatic prayer is a way to work on the nondualistic mind.  It is done by first affirming a statement about God…  For example, “God is love.”  Next we negate this statement: “God is not love.”  Then we negate the negation: “God is not not-love.”

The trinity is a particularly powerful idea for Christians to apahatically meditate over.  This is because the portions of the trinity is true…  And also contradictory.  This first version of a trinity-focused apaphatic meditation will be repetitive and simple.

37A: Simple Trinity-Based Apaphatic Prayer

  1.  Find your center.
  2. Take a cleansing breath.
  3. Inhale.  Say or think, “God is father.”
  4. Exhale.  Say or think, “God is not father.”
  5. Inhale.  Say or think “God is not not-father.”
  6. Take a cleansing breath.
  7. Inhale.  Say or think “God is son.”
  8. Exhale.  Say or think “God is not son.”
  9. Inhale.  Say or think “God is not not-son.”
  10. Take a cleansing breath. 
  11. Inhale.  Say or think, “God is spirit.”
  12. Exhale.  Say or think “God is not spirit.”
  13. Inhale.  Say or think, “God is not not-spirit.”
  14. Take a cleansing breath.
  15. Inhale.  Say or think, “God is father.”
  16. Exhale.  Say or think, “God is not father.”
  17. Inhale.  Say or think “God is not not-father.”
  18. Take a cleansing breath.
  19. Inhale.  Say or think “God is son.”
  20. Exhale.  Say or think “God is not son.”
  21. Inhale.  Say or think “God is not not-son.”
  22. Take a cleansing breath. 
  23. Inhale.  Say or think, “God is spirit.”
  24. Exhale.  Say or think “God is not spirit.”
  25. Take a cleansing breath.
  26. Inhale.  Say or think, “God is father.”
  27. Exhale.  Say or think, “God is not father.”
  28. Inhale.  Say or think “God is not not-father.”
  29. Take a cleansing breath.
  30. Inhale.  Say or think “God is son.”
  31. Exhale.  Say or think “God is not son.”
  32. Inhale.  Say or think “God is not not-son.”
  33. Take a cleansing breath. 
  34. Inhale.  Say or think, “God is spirit.”
  35. Exhale.  Say or think “God is not spirit.”

 

Background: The following exercise, begins, like 37A, with considering the 3 person of the trinity, but then moves on to consider the other contradictory implications of the doctrine.

Exercise 37B

  1.  Find your center.
  2. Take a cleansing breath.
  3. Inhale.  Say or think, “God is father.”
  4. Exhale.  Say or think, “God is not father.”
  5. Inhale.  Say or think “God is not not-father.”
  6. Take a cleansing breath.
  7. Inhale.  Say or think “God is son.”
  8. Exhale.  Say or think “God is not son.”
  9. Inhale.  Say or think “God is not not-son.”
  10. Take a cleansing breath. 
  11. Inhale.  Say or think, “God is spirit.”
  12. Exhale.  Say or think “God is not spirit.”
  13. Take a cleansing breath.
  14. Inhale.  Say or think “God is one.”
  15. Exhale.  Say or think “God is not one.”
  16. Inhale.  Say or think “God is not not-one.”
  17. Take a cleansing breath.
  18. Inhale.  Say or think “God is father.”
  19. Exhale.  Say or think “God is not father.”
  20. Inhale.  Say or think “God is not father.”
  21. Take a cleansing breath.
  22. Inhale.  Say or think “God is three.”
  23. Exhale.  Say or think “God is not three.”
  24. Inhale.  Say or think “God is not not-three.”
  25. Take a cleansing breath.
  26. Inhale.  Say or think “God is son.”
  27. Exhale.  Say or think “God is not son.”
  28. Inhale.  Say or think “God is not not-son.”
  29. Take a cleansing breath.
  30. Inhale.  Say or think “God is three-in-one.”
  31. Exhale.  Say or think “God is not three-in-one.”
  32. Inhale.  Say or think “God is not not-three-in-one.”
  33. Take a cleansing breath.
  34. Inhale.  Say or think “God is spirit.”
  35. Exhale.  Say or think “God is not spirit.”
  36. Inhale.  Say or think “God is not not spirit.”

 

Exercise 36: A Welcoming Prayer

Background: This prayer become popular in the centering prayer movement.  It was originally written by Mary Mrozowski.  It is a method of recognizing, then releasing difficult emotions.

Proponents of this prayer state that the focus should be on our feelings about life circumstances, rather than the exercise itself.

36 A

The Exercise:

  1.  Create a safe, quiet environment for yourself.  Turn down your phone and consider lighting a candle.
  2. Breathe deeply in through the nose and out through the mouth.
  3. Take a mental inventory of where you are, right now.  List the feelings you are experiencing.  Do your best to engage this with a nonjudgemental attitude.  Your feelings are neither good nor bad.  They simply are.  
  4. Choose the feeling which seems to be the most impactful.  Think, or say “Welcome ___________”  (E.G. ‘Welcome, Fear.  Welcome, sadness.  Welcome, anxiety.  Etc.)
  5. Say, or think, ‘I let go of my desire to change this feeling.’  or ‘I let go of my ___________’  or ‘God, I give you my _____________’
  6. Progress on to the next emotion, repeating steps 4 and 5.
  7. When you have worked through these emotions, spend a moment doing a mental inventory, assessing whether you feel differently.

36 B

  1. Create a safe, quiet environment for yourself.  Turn down your phone and consider lighting a candle.
  2. Breathe deeply in through the nose and out through the mouth.
  3. Take a mental inventory of where you are, right now.  List the feelings you are experiencing.  Do your best to engage this with a nonjudgemental attitude.  Your feelings are neither good nor bad.  They simply are.  
  4. Choose the feeling which seems to be the most impactful.  Think, or say “Welcome ___________”  (E.G. ‘Welcome, Fear.  Welcome, sadness.  Welcome, anxiety.  Etc.)
  5. Breathe once.
  6. Say, or think “I let go of my desire for security and survival.’
  7. Breathe again.
  8. Say, or think, ‘I let go of my desire for esteem and affection.’
  9. Breathe again.
  10. Say, or think ‘I let go of my desire for power and control.’
  11. Breathe.
  12. Say, or think, ‘I let go of my desire to change the situation.’
  13. If you wish, you can repeat this process for a second, troubling emotion.

 

Contemplation and Pseudo-Contemplation

There are so many things competing for our attention.

The makers of our devices are engaged in a kind-of arms race.  Instead of creating weapons of destruction, instead of having a goal of militaristic conquest, they are creating weapons of distraction.  The goal is not conquest, it is mindlessness.  But it is still an arms race.

They are very good at what they do.  And the goods and services they provide are not bad things in moderation.

But make no mistake: endlessly scrolling through a facebook feed only feels like meditation.

(And please, feel no judgement or shame here!  I am writing as much to myself as I am to you, dear reader!  These struggles are real!)

Further, meditating but being willing to be distracted…  Engaging in a spiritual exercise while having my facebook page open, so that I can take a little break if I get that endorphin-producing ‘ping’….  that is not really meditation.  That is wasting time while I am hoping that something interesting is going to happen on my social media feeds.

Part of the growth promised by these spiritual exercises is in facing down boredom.  More than just filling my time, the important thing is that I stop running from my fears about myself and the world.  This is why it is so valuable to commit to a length of time each day.  So much good will result when I don’t offer myself easy retreats out of this sometimes difficult work.

Let’s make a deal with each other, and with outselves.  Let’s agree that we might choose to engage in distractions: music to fill up the air, games as candy for our eyes, social media as a venue for our monkey mind to do a little dance.  But let’s be honest about it.  If we are going to do it, let’s make the conscious decision to do these things.  They are o.k. in moderation.  But let’s not pretend that we are meditating while really we are just looking for an excuse to engage those activities.

You can help in turning The Faith-ing Project into a fully functioning community.  You can do this in several ways:

  • Share your thoughts, feelings, and criticism below in the comments.
  • email otherjeffcampbell7@gmail.com to share something directly with the Project’s Director, to join our next email campaign, or to ask to be placed on the mailing list.
  • Access exclusive content and help The Faithing Project share spiritual practices with a world in desperate need.  Become a  Patron.
  • follow @faithingproject on twitter.

 

 

Exercise 35 Loving-Kindness

Background:  There is a Buddhist tradition of a loving-kindness meditation.  The exercises below are two versions recently practiced in The Faith-ing Project’s Thanksgiving Campaign.  The first more closely aligns with the Buddhist tradition.  The second reworks some of the Buddhist Concepts with a Christian, Gallic framework.

Exercise 35A: Buddhist Loving-Kindness Meditation
1.  Create a calm, and quiet space; turn off your phone and do your best to assure yourself of uninterupted time.
2. For the duration of this exercise, give yourself permission to be free of the duties and obligations that you normally submit yourself to.
3.  For a minute or two, simply breathe: in through the nose, and out through the mouth,
4.  Think of a person you feel gratitude for.  (Choose, more or less randomly, a single person to focus on.  Don’t worry, you will have an opportunity to focus on others shortly.)
5. Inhale and  bring their appearance to your mind.  Try and hear their voice, and even smell their unique smell.  Feel, as best you can, their presence.  Exhale.
6.  For the duration of a breath, allow yourself to experience whatever feelings this person stirs within you at this moment.
7. With your next inhale, think to this person ‘May you be free from suffering.’
8. Exhale.
9.  With your next inhale, think to this person ‘May you be healthy.’
10. Exhale.
11.  With your next inhale, think ‘May you be happy.’
12.  Exhale.
13.  With your next inhale, think ‘May you find peace and joy.’
14. Exhale.
15.  For the next breath, rejoice in the thought that your friend would be experiencing all these.
16.  If there is more time you had set aside for your spiritual practice, you might move on to another person you feel grateful for.  If you are having trouble choosing, consider these questions:
Who are you grateful for in your home?  Who are you grateful for in your school or workplace?  Who are you thankful for in your social circles?  Who are you thankful for from your past?  Who are you thankful for in your present?  Are there people who took on a role of parent, sibling, boss, coworker, lover, friend, coach, leader, follower that you are thankful for?  People who shaped you personally, professionally, or spiritually?
Whoever you choose, the phrases to focus on are these:
May you be free from suffering.
May you be healthy.
May you be happy.
May you find peace and joy.
17.  When you are ready to conclude today’s practice, take a single, cleansing breath.
18.  Now, with your inhale, think this for yourself: May I be free from suffering.
19.  Exhale.
20.  With your inhale: May I be healthy.
21.  Exhale.
22.  With your inhale: May I be happy.
23.  Exhale.
24.  Inhale, think: May I find peace and joy.

Exercise 35B: A Gallic-Christian Practice.
1.  Create a calm, and quiet space; turn off your phone and do your best to assure yourself of uninterupted time.
2. For the duration of this exercise, give yourself permission to be free of the duties and obligations that you normally submit yourself to.
3.  For a minute or two, simply breathe: in through the nose, and out through the mouth,
4.  Think of a person you feel gratitude for.  (Choose, more or less randomly, a single person to focus on.  Don’t worry, you will have an opportunity to focus on others shortly.)
5. Inhale and  bring their appearance to your mind.  Try and hear their voice, and even smell their unique smell.  Feel, as best you can, their presence.  Exhale.
6.  For the duration of a breath, allow yourself to experience whatever feelings this person stirs within you at this moment.
7. With your next inhale, think to this person ‘May the road rise up to meat you.’
8. Exhale.
9.  With your next inhale, think to this person ‘May the wind be always at your back.’
10. Exhale.
11.  With your next inhale, think ‘May the sun shine warm on your face.’
12.  Exhale.
13.  With your next inhale, think ‘May the rains fall softly on your fields’
14. Exhale.
15.  With the next inhale, think ‘May God hold you in the palm of his hand.’
15.  For the next breath, rejoice in the thought that your friend would be experiencing all these.
16.  If there is more time you had set aside for your spiritual practice, you might move on to another person you feel grateful for.  If you are having trouble choosing, consider these questions:
Who are you grateful for in your home?  Who are you grateful for in your school or workplace?  Who are you thankful for in your social circles?  Who are you thankful for from your past?  Who are you thankful for in your present?  Are there people who took on a role of parent, sibling, boss, coworker, lover, friend, coach, leader, follower that you are thankful for?  People who shaped you personally, professionally, or spiritually?
Whoever you choose, the phrases to focus on are these:
May the road rise up to meet you.
May the wind be always at your back.
May the sun shine warm upon your face;
the rains fall soft upon your fields,
may God hold you in the palm of His hand.

17.  When you are ready to conclude today’s practice, take a single, cleansing breath.
18.  Now, with your inhale, think this for yourself: May the roads rise up to meet me..
19.  Exhale.
20.  With your inhale: May the winds always be at my back.
21.  Exhale.
22.  With your inhale: May the sun shine warm upon my face.
23.  Exhale.
24.  Inhale, think: May the rains fall soft upon my fields.
25.  Exhale.
26 Inhale, think, ‘May God hold me in the palm of his hand.’