Tag Archives: plants

Exercise 48: More Breathing Toward Oneness

Background: You might find this to be most effective after exercise 47.  In some ways, it is a follow-up to that exercise.

Our every day assumption is that our consciousness (ego, mind) is in control of things like our breathing.  The main evidence for this assumption is rooted in the idea that when I think “I am going to breathe slowly now.”  I do, in fact, start to breathe slowly.

However, it is worth noticing a few things about this assumption.  The first is that (thankfully) when we stop thinking about our breathing, we continue to breathe.  The second is that if we asked for an account of how we do things like change our breath or move an arm, we couldn’t give much more of an explanation than “well, I think about it, then it happens.”

There are some aspects of neuroscience that are beginning to endorse the idea that our consciousness tells a story about what is going on and our body, rather than causing those changes to take place.  In other words, there are good reasons to suppose that when we begin to breathe slowly, we think “I am going to breathe slowly now.” and assume our thought caused the action, when in fact, the opposite is true.

The Exercise

  1.  Find a relaxed position.  Generally speaking, this will be a seated position with feet flat on the floor and spine as straight as is comfortable.
  2. Notice your breath.  Allow yourself to be aware of it with out seeking to change it.
  3. Feel the inhale: notice where the breath comes in on the nostrils or mouth.  Observe the flow of air down the throat and into the belly.
  4. Feel the exhale.  Notice the difference in the temperature and moisture of the air as it leaves the body.
  5. Continue this for at least three more breaths.  Continue longer if that feels right.
  6. As you continue to observe this process, recall that a story goes that God reached down and breathed into a handfull of Earth.  After that breath, there was Adam.
  7. Observe the exhale.
  8. Continue this for two more breaths: God-in-the-universe is breathing you.
  9. Open your heart and mind to the awareness that other people and animals in your area (perhaps your family in other bedrooms, or the other occupants of the building you are in) are breathing, too; God-in-the-universe is breathing them.
  10. As you complete a second and third breathe with this awareness, continue to observe this breath being breathed in you.
  11. Open your mind and heart to the plants and even microscopic organisms all around you.  Some living things inhale oxygen and exhale carbon dioxide.  Others do the reverse.  See the world breathing in all these creatures.
  12. Sit in this flow and connection for as long as you would like.  
  13. Can you widen this network of connections?  Can you make it geographically larger?  Can you expand the nature of the interconnections.
  14. When you are ready, return to your every day world.  Hold on to the connections between the rest of the world that were deepened here.

 

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Exercise 47: Oneness Within a Web of Living Beings

Background:  Thinkers such as Ken Wilber have observed that it is somewhat arbitrary, the ways that we put importance on a single individual.  We are made of millions of cells.  The cells are arranged in tissues, the tissues are are arranged in organs.  The organs are arranged in organ systems.  The organ systems are arranged in organisms.  The organisms are arranged in communities.  The communities are arranged in ecosystems.  All the ecosystems, when taken together, form the biosphere.

We have consciousness of ourselves as individuals, of course.  But this seems like a small reason to put so much of our attention to one middle-level of this arrangement.  There is something to be said for the idea that the consciousness we think is running the show is in fact just giving us a report of the things that are already happening.

If you can do the following practice in the presence of a a plant, or better yet a tree, that is a definite plus.

The Practice

1.  Find a comfortable position.  Release your worries and expectations.  Place your phone on silent mode.

2.  Breathe in, through the nose if you can.

3.  Breathe out, through the mouth.

4.  Try to breathe in more deeply.  Place your hand on your abdomen and feel it move.

5.  Exhale again.  

6.  Take one last inhale, before we move in to the next step.  Can you make it your deepest?

7.  Fully exhale.

8.  Spend a moment considering a plant or tree.  Behold and love it.  Consider the individuality of this one specific plant.  See it’s leaves and branches.  Imagine the roots of the thing.  Allow your thoughts or eyes to really linger on this friend.

9.  With your next inhale, breathe in.  Recognize that some of the very air you breathed might have been made from that plant.

10.  With your next exhale, breathe the air out knowing this is what the plant will need.  It will inhale the carbon dioxide of your breath.

11.  Take two more deep breaths, connecting with the plant in this relationship of oxygen and carbon dioxide.

12.  When you are ready, try to erase the boundaries between yourself and the plant.  Can you imagine a level upon which you and the plant are not two seperate individuals but one common entity?  Experience a sense of oneness with the tree or plant.  It is giving you what you need.  You are giving it what it needs.

13.  Linger on this experience for as long as you need or want to.

14.  Widen this circle in your mind.  See yourself and this tree as a part of all plant-animals and animals within your area.  (perhaps this area is about the size of a city block.)  First, sit with the idea that they are in a perfect, reciprocal cycle of oxygen and carbon dioxide.

15.  The gasses, in a way, are just a metaphor for so much more.  Sit in your place in this system.   Make it larger, in your mind, if you wish.  First, broaden the meaning of relationship, knowing (but don’t bother listing) that we get more than just oxygen.  Then, broaden the size of the network.

16.  When you have made this network as broad, and deep as your mind will allow, sit with it.  In some important sense, all the living creatures in your mind, all the plants and the animals, they are one.

16.  If you would like, consider whether God is present within the animals or plants in this relationship.  Is God above them?  Or the movement of the matter and energy between them?  Both?  Neither?

17.  Hold this web of connection: you, other animals, plants, trees, God in your mind.  Take as long as you would like to sit as one part of this network of relationships.

18.  When you are ready, return in your mind to just you and the plant you begin with.  Consider the differences between yourself and the plant.  Try and hold to the idea that you are still one.  But the plant has specialties.  So do you.  The organism that is formed between the two of you is greater than the sum of your parts.  Think about the ways that you and the plant are such a good pair.

19.  When you are ready to dismiss this practice, thank the plant and move into your day, knowing that you can bring your mind back to your place in this tremendous network of beings.